close up of blue eye
More than 350 different eye diseases can be directly linked to hereditary factors. Moreover, many other health conditions with a genetic component, including diabetes, have eye disease as a hallmark, such as macular degeneration or retinopathy. However, many people with a genetic predisposition to some form of eye disease are unaware they are at high risk of vision loss.
woman putting in contacts
A contact lens is a thin plastic medical device that covers the cornea to help one see the world sharply. Although there are many options, sharing your lifestyle with your eye care professional will help you find the safest lens option to accommodate your lifestyle.  
woman receiving dental exam
According to the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), more than 40% of U.S. adults age 30 years or over are estimated to have some degree of periodontitis. Reducing periodontal disease can significantly decrease the risk for any number of diseases for which a link has been proven, including glaucoma.
Man doing home repair
We might be inclined to think of home as a place where eye injuries and other accidents are less likely to occur. The truth is, nearly half of all eye injuries occur in the home. In fact, home repairs, yard work, cleaning, and cooking cause more than 40 percent of eye injuries.
Two older women wearing glasses
By the age of 65, one in three individuals has some form of vision-reducing eye disease. Some of the most common age-related eye diseases among seniors include cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
Young girl doing school work on laptop
With children returning to the classroom this fall, many parents, guardians, and caregivers are busy buying school supplies to set them up for a great school year. However, they may not be including one of the most important steps for ensuring children’s long-term success in their back-to-school prep list – an eye exam.
Hat sunglasses and sunscreen on the beach
Wearing sunscreen, properly hydrating and taking some time out of the sun are some of the best ways we can protect ourselves from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays during the summer. However, protection doesn’t stop at the skin – this UV Safety Awareness Month we must not forget the value of wearing sunglasses and protecting your eyes, as well.
Elderly man wearing glasses while hiking
June marks not only the start of summer but also National Cataract Awareness Month, a time where we recognize the danger of cataracts as well as the preventative measures people can take to protect their vision.
Diverse family of three wearing glasses
Addressing social determinants of health factors is necessary to properly manage patients’ health, prevent serious health conditions, and improve health outcomes in our communities.